Harris to supply electronic jammers for US Navy’s F/A-18 aircraft

4 May 2016 (Last Updated May 4th, 2016 18:30)

Harris has received a $88m order from the US Navy to supply electronic jammers for F/A-18 Hornet and Super Hornet aircraft.

Jammers

Harris has received a $88m order from the US Navy to supply electronic jammers for F/A-18 Hornet and Super Hornet aircraft.

The contract continues 18 years of support from the company for the navy's Integrated Defensive Electronic Countermeasures (IDECM) programme.

The latest order is a modification of a contract awarded to Harris last year for the manufacture and delivery of 48 on-board electronic warfare jamming systems in support of the IDECM programme.

“Naval aviators face a growing range of threats as their missions evolve and hostile actors gain access to increasingly advanced technology.”

The IDECM is deployed onto the carrier-based F/A-18C/D/E/F Hornet / Super Hornet aircraft series to protect the aircraft from any potential radar-guided surface-to-air and air-to-air missile systems attacks.

The jammers serve to shield the navy jets from sophisticated electronic threats, including modern integrated air defence systems.

It generates complex waveform radar and blends sensitive receivers and active countermeasures to form an electronic shield for the aircraft to defeat advanced threat systems.

Harris Electronic Systems president Ed Zoiss said: "Naval aviators face a growing range of threats as their missions evolve and hostile actors gain access to increasingly advanced technology.

"Harris has helped keep aviators safe from emerging threats for more than 18 years, and we remain firmly committed to supporting their critical missions."

Last year, the company secured a $97m contract to supply the US Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR) with self protection jammers for the IDECM programme.

Under the contract, Harris was responsible for providing its ALQ-214 radio frequency integrated countermeasure system.


Image: The US Navy's airborne F/A-18F Super Hornet aircraft. Photo: courtesy of Navy Camera Operator.