Austal to support post shakedown availability for USS Jackson (LCS 6)

20 April 2015 (Last Updated April 20th, 2015 18:30)

Austal has been awarded a cost-plus-award-fee order to deliver engineering and management services for advance planning and design, in support of the Post Shakedown Availability for USS Jackson littoral combat ship (LCS 6).

USS Jackson

Austal has been awarded a cost-plus-award-fee order to deliver engineering and management services for advance planning and design, in support of the Post Shakedown Availability for USS Jackson littoral combat ship (LCS 6).

As part of the $11m deal, Austal USA will be responsible for design, planning, and material support services for the vessel, including programme management, advance planning, engineering, design, material kitting, liaison and scheduling.

Austal's shipyard in Mobile, Alabama, will carry out 77% of the work under this contract, while its facility in Fairfax, Virginia, US, will carry out the remaining activity. Work is expected to be completed by September 2016.

The 127m-long, high-speed, highly manoeuvrable combat ship, USS Jackson, has a full-load displacement of 2,637t and an operational range of 4,300nm. The vessel is capable of cruising at a speed of 40k.

The latest contract is part of the previously awarded basic ordering agreement (BOA). Austal secured the original $3.5bn contract from the US Navy to construct ten Littoral Combat Ships.

"The 127m-long, high-speed, highly manoeuvrable combat ship, USS Jackson, has an operational range of 4,300nm."

In addition, the US Navy awarded a separate $1.6bn contract to Austal for the construction of ten 103m-long joint high speed vessels (JHSVs).

The navy has also announced that the next Freedom-variant LCS will be named as USS St. Louis.

Designated as LCS 19, the future USS St. Louis will be the seventh ship to bear the name.

The LCS vessels have been designed to support a range of missions such as defeat asymmetric anti-access threats including mines, quiet diesel submarines and fast surface craft in near-shore environments.


Image: US Navy's USS Jackson littoral combat ship (LCS 6). Photo: courtesy of Austal.