UK Navy’s Daring-class destroyer HMS Duncan suffers propulsion failure

27 November 2016 (Last Updated November 27th, 2016 18:30)

The UK Royal Navy’s Type 45 Daring-class destroyer HMS Duncan had to be reportedly towed back to the port after it suffered a "total propulsion failure” off the Devon coast.

UK Navy’s Daring-class destroyer HMS Duncan suffers propulsion failure

The UK Royal Navy’s Type 45 Daring-class destroyer HMS Duncan had to be reportedly towed back to the port after it suffered a "total propulsion failure” off the Devon coast.

The destroyer was on its way from Davenport naval base to participate in a series of Nato maritime wargames, alongside Spanish, Portuguese and German warships, reported the Telegraph.

A Royal Navy spokesperson was quoted by the Telegraph as saying: “HMS Duncan experienced technical issues and will resume operations once a full assessment has taken place.”

"HMS Duncan experienced technical issues and will resume operations once a full assessment has taken place."

The ship’s propulsion system breakdown was triggered by an electrical failure, which also affected the vessel’s weapon systems, reported the Liberal.

Built by BAE Systems, the Royal Navy’s six Type 45 destroyers have experienced more than 5,000 engine faults with total loss of propulsion, as well as electrical failure, reported Forces.

The first-in-class HMS Daring suffered a power failure in the Atlantic on its maiden deployment in 2009, and the HMS Dauntless left a training drill owing to power outage in 2014.

Earlier this year, the Ministry of Defence (MoD) confirmed performing repairs on all six Daring class warships to ensure their full functionality.