US Navy takes delivery of first Zumwalt-class guided missile destroyer


Zumwalt

The US Navy has taken delivery of the first Zumwalt-class guided missile destroyer, USS Zumwalt (DDG-1000).

Designed for littoral and land attack operations, the multi-mission vessel surface combatant will provide independent forward presence and deterrence.

US Navy Zumwalt commanding officer captain James Kirk said: "Zumwalt's crew has diligently trained for months in preparation of this day and they are ready and excited to take charge of this ship on behalf of the US Navy.

"These are 143 of our nation's finest men and women who continue to honour admiral Zumwalt's namesake with their dedication to bringing this ship to life."

"These are 143 of our nation's finest men and women who continue to honour admiral Zumwalt's namesake with their dedication to bringing this ship to life."

The 610ft-long ship comes with a battery of two advanced gun systems, eighty advanced vertical launch system cells for Tomahawk missiles, Evolved Sea Sparrow missiles, standard missiles, and vertical launch anti-submarine rockets.

Using active and passive sensors and a multi-function radar (MFR), the ship can conduct area air surveillance, including over-land, throughout the sea-land interface.

USS Zumwalt is the first of its kind to feature an integrated power system (IPS) that distributes 1,000 volts of direct current across the ship.

The IPS can allocate all 78MW of installed power to propulsion, ship's service, and combat system loads from the same gas turbine prime movers based on operational requirements.

The positioning of the ship's antennas reduce radar cross section, making the ship less visible to enemy radar at sea.

The ship will be commissioned in Baltimore after completing a crew certification period at General Dynamics-Bath Iron Works. It will then transit to her homeport in San Diego where Mission Systems Activation will continue in parallel with a post delivery availability.


Image: The future guided-missile destroyer USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000) transits the Atlantic Ocean during acceptance trials. Photo: courtesy of US Navy/Released.