US Navy commissions guided-missile destroyer USS Rafael Peralta


The US Navy has commissioned its newest Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Rafael Peralta (DDG 115) at Naval Air Station North Island. 

The 9,200t vessel has been named to honour navy cross recipient and US Marine Corps (USMC) sergeant Rafael Peralta. 

USMC commandant general Robert B Neller said: "This is more than just another commissioning. It marks the commemoration of a life and the immortality of a hero. 

"Sergeant Peralta's legacy will forever be part of this ship."

The US Navy’s USS Rafael Peralta is a multi-mission surface combatant, capable of carrying out anti-air warfare, anti-submarine operations, and anti-surface warfare missions.

As a multi-mission platform, the vessel is also capable of carrying out sustained combat operations, supporting maritime security, sea control, and deterrence.

"The IAMD radar will provide the vessel with improved computing power and radar upgrades that enhance detection and reaction capabilities against modern air warfare threats."

Set to be operational as the 65th Arleigh Burke-class destroyer, the US Navy ship is fitted with the Aegis Baseline 9 Combat System. This system features an integrated air and missile defence (IAMD) capability incorporating ballistic missile defence 5.0 capability upgrade and naval integrated fire control-counter air capability. 

The IAMD radar will provide the vessel with improved computing power and radar upgrades that enhance detection and reaction capabilities against modern air warfare threats. 

Furthermore, the Aegis Combat System will allow the vessel to link radars with other ships and aircraft to deliver a composite picture of the battlespace, in addition to increasing the theatre space.

In December last year, DDG 115 successfully completed acceptance trials after spending two days underway off the coast of Maine, US. 


Image: Marine Corps commandant general Robert B Neller during the commissioning ceremony of USS Rafael Perlata (DDG 115). Photo: courtesy of US Navy by mass communication specialist 2nd class Phil Ladouceur / Released.